Curriculum Vitae

William E. Feeman Jr., M.D.
640 South Wintergarden Road
Bowling Green, Ohio 43402
Phone: 419-352-4665 *** Fax: 419-353-0219 ** Email: BGS43402@yahoo.com

Name: William E. Feeman Jr., M.D.
POB: Columbus, Ohio
Sex/Race: Male/White
Address: 640 South Wintergarden Road, Bowling Green, Ohio 43402
Undergraduate Education: The Ohio State University, College of Arts and Science
(1961-1966) BSc in Physiology
Medical Education: The Ohio State University, College of Medicine
(1966-1970) M.D.
Internship: USAF Medical Center/Wright Patterson Air Foce Base/Dayton, Ohio
(1970-1971) Rotating Internship
Armed Forces Service: USAF Medical Center/RAF Lakenheath/U.K.
(1971-1974) General Medical Officer
Private Practice: Bowling Green, Ohio
(1974-present)
Hospital Staff Appointments: Wood County Hospital, Bowling Green, Ohio
(1974-present)
Medical Organizations: National Lipid Association
International Atherosclerosis Society
European Atherosclerosis Society

Biography

William E. Feeman Jr., M.D., is a physician on staff at Wood County Hospital, and in private practice, both in Bowling Green, Ohio.

He was born into a military family in Columbus, Ohio. He spent his life traveling with his family to various military postings, eventually arriving in western Pennsylvania, where he attended Shaler Township High School. He attended undergraduate school at Ohio State University (1961-1966) and became interested in a career in medicine during that time; prior to his decision to enter medicine he planned to have a career in astronomy. He attended undergraduate medical school at Ohio State University, earning Bachelor of Science in physiology (1961-1966) and an MD at Ohio State University (1966-1970); where he developed an interest in the primary and secondary prevention of atherothrombotic disease.

Dr. Feeman began treating lipids during his term of duty with the USAF at RAF Lakenheath. In 1974 in Bowling Green, Ohio he continued to treat lipid disorders. At that time he realized he needed an age-sex database in order to predict the population at risk of atherothrombotic disease. Over the last 36 plus years, he has spent his professional life in medicine perfecting a tool to predict the population at risk of atherothrombotic disease and to guide therapy to maximally stabilize/reverse that disease if extant. Thus was founded the Bowling Green Study of the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Disease (BGS) to which he is the principal investigator. This study was formally terminated in 2003, but continues on an informal basis.

Dr. Feeman has had six major articles published in various science/medical journal. He has had numerous letters to the editor published in various medical journals. All publications relate to the primary and second prevention of atherothromboitc disease. He has presented data at a number of annual scientific assemblies of the American Academy of Family Physicians and at a number of national and international symposia in atherothrombotic disease.

References:

  1. Feeman W.E. Jr. The Bowling Green Study of the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Atherosclerosis: Descriptive Analysis, Findings, Applications and Conclusions. Ohio J. Sci. 92 (5): 153-181.
  2. Feeman W.E. Jr. The Bowling Green Study of the Primary and Secondary Prevention of Atherosclerotic Disease: Update 1991-1993. Ohio. J. Sci. 94 (4): 105-112
  3. Feeman W.E. Jr. The Role of Cigarette Smoking in Atherosclerotic Disease: An Epidemiologic Analysis. J. Cardio. Risk. 1999; 6: 333-336.
  4. Feeman W.E. Jr. Prediction of Angiographic Stabilization/Regression of Coronary Atherosclerosis by a Risk Factor Graph. J. Cardio. Risk. 2000; 7: 415-423.
  5. Feeman W.E. Jr. Thrombotic Stroke in an Otherwise Healthy Middle-Aged Female Related to the Use of Continuous-Combined Conjugated Equine Estrogens and Medroxyprogesterone Acetate. Journal of Gender-Specific Medicine. 2000; 8: 61-64.
  6. Feeman W.E. Jr. Prediction of the Population at Risk of Atherothrombotic Disease. Experimental and Clinical Cardiology. Winter 2004; 9(4); 235-241.
  7. Feeman W.E. Jr. The Prediction/Prevention of Atherothrombotic Disease. OFP. 2005; 57(4): pages 26, 27, 45.

Letters to the Editor:

  1. Another Arbiter Role for the EEG. NEJM. 1970; 283 (11): 603/
  2. Evaluation of Human Behavior. JAMA. 1971; 218 (11): 1703-1704.
  3. Comment on Prevention of Diabetic Atherosclerosis. Pediatrics. October 1974; 54 (4). 522.
  4. Lipid Prognostications. Cardiovascular Reviews and Reports. March 1988; 9 (3): 16.
  5. CT as an Initial Screening Tool: A Step Back Into the Dark Ages? Ohio Medicine. April 1988; 84 (4): 253-256.
  6. Lovastatin. AFP. August 1988; 38 (2): 65-66,68.
  7. Lipids and Hypertension. JAMA. 1989; 261: 2954.
  8. Cholesterol Testing. BMJ. 1989; 299: 624-625.
  9. Cholesterol Guidelines. Ann Intern. Med. 1989; 111:1047-1048.
  10. On Cholesterol Testing of Children. Ohio Medicine. November 1989; 85: 837.
  11. Cholesterol Crusade Continues. Ohio Medicine. February 1990; 86 (2):91.
  12. The Cholesterol Debate: Finding a Common Ground. Patient Care. April 1990: 21, 24.
  13. The Cholesterol Wars, Part II. Ohio Medicine. May 1990; 86 (5): 340-341.
  14. Lipid Abnormalities and Diuretics. AFP. August 1990; 42 (2): 315, 318.
  15. Cholesterol Screening. Pediatrics. 1992; 89: 686-687.
  16. A Better Way to Reverse CAD? Patient Care. May 1992; 20.
  17. Recognizing the HDL Factor. Medical World News. May 1992.
  18. A Better Way to Screen for Dyslipidemia. Modern Medicine. May 1992; 60: 8-9.
  19. Concerns of Effects of Diuretics and Beta Blockers on Cholesterol. Family Practice Recertification. 1992; 14 (6):22,24.
  20. Dyslipidemic Hypertension. Journal of Family Practice. May 1994; 38 (5): 445-446.
  21. Sustained-Release Forms of Calcium Channel Blockers Do Not Appear to Raise the Risk of MI. Modern Medicine. June 1995; 63: 57.
  22. Myocardial Infarction Associated with Antihypertensive Drug Therapy. JAMA. 1996; 275: 515-516.
  23. Hypertriglyceridemia and Atherosclerosis. Ann. Intern. Med. 1989; 128: 73-75.
  24. Lipids Links Publication. March 2001. Pages 1-9.
  25. Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of High Cholesterol. JAMA. 2001; 286: 2400.
  26. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Cardiovascular Disease. Circulation 2002; 105: e71.
  27. Risk Factors Versus Inflammation in Atherothrombotic Disease. Circulation 2002; 106: e31.
  28. Poll on HRT. Cortlandt Forum. November 2002; 76.
  29. Low-Density Lipoprotein, Non-High-Density Lipoprotein, and Apolipoprotein B as Targets of Lipid-Lowering Therapy. Circulation 2003; 107: e199.
  30. Reducing Cardiovascular Disease. British Medical Journal. September 19, 2003.
  31. Hormone Therapy After Menopause. Cardiology Review. July 2003; Volume 20: 8: page 6.
  32. Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus. Circulation. 2004; 109: 1
  33. Hyperlipidemia. Advanced Studies in Medicine. John Hopkins University School of Medicine. February 2004: 4 (2): pgs 68 and 102.
  34. Identifying Risk of Atherothrombotic Disease. Cardiology Review. October 2004: 21 (11): page 16 and page 47.
  35. Editorial—Hyperlipidemia (Dr. Ferdinand) John Hopkins University School of Medicine. January 2005: 5 (1): page 20 and page 54.
  36. Don’t Encourage the Lawyers. Courtlandt Forum. May 2005. 12.
  37. High LDL and HDL: Implications in a Perimenopausal Woman. Consultant. June 2005; 45 (7): 726.
  38. Cardiology and Primary Care. Patient Care. June 2005: 15.
  39. National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Guidelines Too Complex. Preventive Cardiology. Summer 2005; 8 (3): 188.
  40. Prehypertension. Ann Fam Med. August 26, 2005.
  41. The Prediction/Prevention of Atherothrombotic Disease. Winter 2005; 26-27.
  42. Associated Atherothrombotic Disease Risk factors in Diabetes and Prediabetes. The American Journal of Medicine, Volume 119, Issue 5, May 2006, Page 19.
  43. Calculating LDL-Cholesterol Levels. Lipid Spin. Summer 2006: 10.
  44. Cholesterol and the Primary Prevention of CHD. The Ohio Family Physician. Winter 2006; 58 (4): 13.
  45. Treatment of Dyslipidemia. Journal of Clinical Hypertension. December 2006; 8 (12) 907-908.
  46. Dyslipidemia VS Hyperglycemia. Preventive Cardiology. Spring 2007. 10 (2). 112.
  47. CAD and Imaging. Cardiology Review. July 2007; 24 (7): 7,26.
  48. Consider This Risk Tool for Diabetic Patients. Journal of Family Practice. 2007. 56:(11); 886.
  49. Metabolic Syndrome as a Marker of Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and ATD. Lipid Spin. Winter 2007; 4 (1): 17.
  50. Lipid Ratios and the Prediction of Atherothrombotic Risk. Consultant. January 2008; 48 (1): 12, 14.
  51. Statin-Fibrate Combination Therapy. American Journal of Cardiology, May 2008: page 1521.
  52. Statin-Fibrate Combination Therapy. American Journal of Cardiology. May 15, 2008: 1521.
  53. Statins and Diabetes. Lancet. 2008; 371: 1752.
  54. Dyslipidemia in a Diabetic Patient. Cortlandt Forum. July/August 2008. 17,18.
  55. Treating Lipids in the General Population. American Journal of Cardiology. August 1, 2008; 372-373
  56. Advanced Lipoprotein Testing. Lipid Spin. August 2008; 6 (4): 22.
  57. Effect of HDL Measurement Technique on Clinical Lipidology. Journal of Clinical Lipidology. 2008. 2;(5); 401-402.
  58. Rosouvastatin, C-Reactive Protein, LDL Cholesterol, and the JUPITER Trial. Lancet. 2009. 374; 24.
  59. Medical Management Before Cardiovascular Event. Journal of Clinical Lipidology. April 2010; 4 (2): 136-137.
  60. Feeman WE Jr. Diabetes Mellitus is Not a Coronary Heart Disease Equivalent. American Journal of Cardiology. September 1 2010; 754-755.
  61. Combined Effect of Hypothyroidism and Hyperlipoproteinemia. Journal of Clinical Lipidology. 2011; 5 (1): 57.

American Academy of Family Physicians Exhibitis

1978 Atlanta, Georgia
   
1982 San Francisco, California
   
1983 Miami Beach, Florida
   
1984 Kansas City, Missouri
   
1987 San Francisco, California
   
1990 Dallas, Texas
   
1991 Washington, D.C.
   
1992 San Diego, California
   
1993 Orlando, Florida
   
1995 Anaheim, California
   
1996 New Orleans, Louisiana
   
1997 Chicago, Illinois
   
1999 Orlando, Florida
   
2001 Atlanta, Georgia
   
2002 San Diego, California
   
2003 New Orleans, Louisiana
   
2004 Orlando, Florida
Exhibits At International and National Symposia
  1. North American Primary Research Group. May 1987—Minnesota
  2. National Conference on High Blood Pressure Control. May 1989-Lake Buena Vista, Florida
  3. 3rd International Conference on Preventive Cardiology. June 1993—Oslo, Norway
  4. Great Lakes Regional Conference-Cardiovascular Prevention. November 1993—Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  5. American Heart Association Conference on Atherosclerosis, Thrombosis and Proliferation. February 1994—Orlando, Florida
  6. 3rd International Conference on Multiple Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Disease. July 1994—Florence, Italy
  7. Joint Conference on Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology. American Heart Association. February 1996—Salt Lake City, Utah
  8. Frontiers in Lipid and Lipoprotein Research. October 1996—Dallas, Texas
  9. 4th International Symposium on Multiple Risk Factors in Cardiovascular Disease. April 1997—Washington D.C.
  10. 12th International Symposium on Atherosclerosis. June 2000—Stockholm, Sweden
  11. 14th International Symposium on Drugs Affecting Lipid Metabolism. September 2001—New York City, New York
  12. Third International Meeting-Society of Atherosclerosis Imaging. May 2004—New Orleans, Louisiana
  13. Second International Conference on Women, Heart Disease and Stroke. February 2005—Orlando, Florida
  14. 14th International Symposium on Atherosclerosis, June 2006, Roma Italy
  15. XVI International Symposium on Drugs Affecting Lipid Metabolism (DALM), October 2007, New York, New York.
  16. National Lipid Association (NLA) Scientific Sessions, May 2008, Seattle, Washington.
  17. Feeman Jr. WE. The Prediction of the Population at Risk of Atherothrombotic Disease is Independent of Blood Sugar Levels. International Atherosclerosis Society Scientific Symposium–Boston, 2009
  18. Feeman WE Jr. The Bowling Green Study Graph Predicts the Population at Risk of Atherothrombitic Disease Better than the Framigham Risk Score. Presented at the International Atherosclerosis Society Scientific Symposium, 2009. Boston.
  19. Feeman WE Jr. Predicting the Population at Risk of Atherothrombotic Disease using a Lipid Ratio. National Lipid Assoc. Scientific Sessions. May 2010. Chicago
  20. Feeman WE Jr. The Bowling Green Study Graph Predicts the Population at risk of Atherothrombitic Disease Better than the Framigham Risk Score. National Lipid Assoc. Scientific Sessions. May 2010. Chicago.
  21. Feeman WE Jr. Blood Sugar Levels Are Not Essential to the Prediction of the risk of Atherothrombotic Disease. National Lipid Assoc. Scientific Sessions. May 2010. Chicago
  22. Feeman WE Jr. Blood Sugar Levels Are Not Essential to the Prediction of the risk of Atherothrombotic Disease. European Atherosclerosis Society Symposium, Hamburg. 2010


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